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Fast Start — Failure Demand

Fast start conversation: Demand for time comes from every angle. Critical evaluation looks at Failure Demand as a resource expectation. At work we have demand for productivity. However is this productivity to create value or is it our productivity in demand to fix, rework, or mitigate failure. Productivity is value that we add. In Failure Demand, a post from Lean Consulting, the premise: Failure Demand is the delivery or production of products and services downstream, as a result of defects in the system upstream. Failure upstream can cause further work downstream. I say can as some poor work may fall into unknown risk or worse the hope that a problem never comes up. Time is the one element people and organizations never get back. Money, sure, you can make more money, but time, no, that is finite. Take a look …

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Forget what you learned

That training program you endured was a waste of time. Forget what you learned. Just take a day and you already forgot the majority. Even worse, the training program you deliver is a waste of time. The reason: we have an incredible ability to forget. I want to challenge you to forget what you learned about training and learning. Focus on forgetting, in this case the help I offer is the Forgetting Curve. Not only do we have an incredible ability to forget, within 20 minutes we forget 40% of the subject or skill just reviewed. One day later, within 24 hours, we forget 60%. Imagine those knowledge transfer efforts you are part of. Imagine those train the trainer facades that involve you. Imagine those one-way corporate training lectures you suffer through. Useless. All useless, with 20 minutes 40% useless, within …

Kingpin, Agile, Lean, blog

Scrum without Lean is an HR #fail

Executives expect Agile results, but too few executives and managers realize the organization change necessary to support Agile results. Agile without Lean is an executive landmine and Scrum without Agile requires human resource partners. Where Lean involves the whole system focus on customer value, Agile further extends Lean DNA for results and this requires that human resources (HR) gain a Lean understanding as well as understand Agile methods. Many organizations who attempt Agile expect Agile results: fast design, zero defect, customer delight, motivated employees, all of that. The Agile framework of choice is Scrum: By early 2009, more organizations were using Agile processes than waterfall processes, and of those employing Agile 84%, were using Scrum. The heart of Scrum must include collaboration, motivation, and people development. Scrum and HR have to work together. Scrum has close alignment to human resource …

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The 2 most important learning metrics

CEOs care about learning programs. To gain more executive-level interest, guess what learning and development folks? CEOs want metrics. Give them learning metrics. The learning metrics you may have collected and reported on might need adjustment to become important to an executive. The organization challenge that leader’s need to recognize is that an organization’s ability to learn and to adapt is the only source of competitive advantage. Development professionals only gain stature in the business environment when they meet and plan business solutions. The ROI Institute and Chief Learning Officer magazine have a study recap that should provide a clearer map of our worth. The targets of this survey were CEOs at Fortune 500 companies and the top 50, privately held firms. From this population 450 firms received a survey and 95 firms, 21%, responded. Quick hits: 4% of CEOs avoid learning and development …

Magnificent Seven, team of me, blog, Toby Elwin

High performance team of me

Many times what looks like a team is not team. A high performance team is beyond skin deep and requires shared understanding. A collection of well-intended professionals that meet, from time-to-time, around business issues, is not a team. In What It Takes to Build a Team, John R. Anderson’s dense and rewarding read, reminds me that there is no ‘I’ in team. Identity shapes how people describe their world. The range of options that someone can identify and define their view presents little issue, until collaboration. Teams work in concert to meet common goals: Share success; Collaborate for achievement; and Willing to give up resources for the good of the collective High Performance Team Law In our world of people, process, and technology, a single item can mean multiple things. The law of identity presents a shared meaning, not mixed …

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Subjective communication objective

Successful communication inspires action and is clear to others what needs to happen to meet that objective.

All communication faces daunting odds to reach each person, intention intact. Perception, bias, and noise lay between intent, action, and reaction.

To succeed in the communication obstacle course against intent, you need to make clear how to make it happen.

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One rule to rule all: listen hear

Many managers take control with the belief their technical expertise in their field is more important in their management role than the challenge to manage finite resources of people, time, and budget.

Any technical ability the manager had, as an individual contributor to meet their functional skill, is not as important as the ability to listen, to motivate, to teach, to learn.

To promote the contrary is to promote insanity.

wonder woman, change management, Toby Elwin, blog

The change in change management

Change management goes beyond features and functions. Feature and function change management is product change management.

Change management goes beyond scope or requirements. Scope and requirement change management is project change management.

The change that change management needs is an account for how process and technology change the way people meet their objectives.

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Fast Start — The brilliant mistake of health and wellness

A healthy employee is a productive employee and health and wellness programs roll out across corporate America to capture this gain.

Compensation expert Carol Harnett shares her brilliant mistake from this Human Resource Executive article and detail on the data to her assumptions that reveal flaws in health and wellness resource commitments.

Fast Start questions brilliant mistakes.

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Ms. Education after graduation

In education our schools reward women. Men can’t hack certain academics: they get worse grades; follow less-rigorous academic programs; and take part in less advanced-placement classes. Post-education, our professional organizations reward men. Women get more criticism and less praise in the workplace than men do, paid 7% less than men, and judged more negatively by prospective employers than men with identical backgrounds. Same species different rules and learning engagement, why?

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Fast Start — What, Really, is Change Management?

Fast Start conversation: What, Really, is Change Management? Change swirls around organizations:  regulation, industry, competition, policy, knowledge, technology ability, and skills.  And those hit us before the first cup of coffee. There’s a professional approach to manage change, but what, really is change management? And who, specifically, defines, designs, and launches change management for whom? Brad Hall writes in TheStreet, a media company that provides financial news, commentary, analysis, ratings, and business and investment content, change management has three requirements: Each individual knows precisely what is expected of him/her; HR systems aligned to the new expectations; and The role of the manager is very clear If your change management does not include those three requirements, than you are arguing against Mr. Hall and his industrial-organizational psychology Ph. D. and that’s like arguing against your Chief Human Resource Officer. I completely agree with the three above, as …

1812, book, George Daughan, blog, Toby Elwin

1812: The Navy’s War by the book

I love history. Leaders, in trying times and challenges making pivot-point decisions that shape and impact states and people. Games people play that reverberate for decades and centuries, from a people and systems development frame, fascinates me. I read history and see organization development, leadership coaching, and strategic planning and wonder how  personalities and politics frame decisions and how I might analyze, recommend, or design a solution had I been a present. Currently, I am drawn to review the United States’ history, from experimental governing conception.  Earlier I wrote about A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic as a fascinating, well-written, engaging, and dynamic read for anyone — talk about change management. Where Leap in the Dark took me from the birth of the U.S.A. to the dawn of the Jefferson’s presidency, this book picks up at the dawn of Jefferson’s presidency.  For …

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Fast Start — Scourge of Performance Reviews

Fast Start conversation:  Performance reviews are rarely done with the end in mind:  to augment what works and to highlight opportunity for even more effectiveness. Too often the review process is more façade than intention with process over promise. 94% of 1,400-plus participating CFOs said performance reviews are effective in helping employees improve performance. Among 422 workers employed in office environments, only 62% said the same. In Scourge of Performance Reviews, CFO.com’s David McCann offers a view worth reading. CFOs = satisfied, employees = not quite.  Why is that? If you are an engaged manager, after all, why would you need an official performance review anyway?