Fistful of beans 08/24/2011

3 of things I’ve seen, read, or thought might seed results:

1.   Bored People Quit — Rands in Response blog

People who quit say:  “I don’t believe in this company.”  Bored people quit.

The author of this post is neither an HR professional nor an organization development/behavior professional, this author simply manages people.  I say simply because a people manager’s primary job is people.  Managers manage people like it their job, not their nuisance.  This rather raw article is written by a manager who realizes bored people are the manager’s fault; his fault.

I think of boredom as a clock. Every second that someone on my team is bored, a second passes on this clock. After some aggregated amount of seconds that varies for every person, they look at the time, throw up their arms, and quit.

Take a read on how an active manager manages, how managing means maximizing resources, and the steps to dole out tough work and parse out the exciting work, as well.

2.  I’m OK, You’re Biased — The New York Times

As the article points out:

Consultants believe they can make objective decisions about the companies that indirectly employ them, just as legislators believe that campaign contributions don’t influence their votes.

Doctors scoff at the notion that gifts from a pharmaceutical company could motivate them to prescribe that company’s drugs, and Supreme Court justices are confident that their legal opinions are not influenced by their financial stake in a defendant’s business, or by their child’s employment at a petitioner’s firm.

What’s the solution to bias?  It looks like a pretty easy fix.

3.  Engaging Employees to Drive Global Success — Mercer

Engagement is a sexy word today.  I guess most organizations got tired of reading survey responses that revealed how little they motivate their employees.  Mercer is a top HR human resource consulting firm with thought leadership in recruiting and talent motivation.

This a Mercer report on engagement.  I take Mercer reports as a serious baseline for most discussions with people to busy to care about people.  Nice to bandy about big consulting firm studies when dealing with folks who need, absolutely are desperate for, data.

As an aside:  If you do not use SlideShare you are missing out on a great social networking site focused on sharing presentations and files.  SlideShare is a great source for research and thought leadership.

This Mercer presentation was posted by Elizabeth L, someone I follow on SlideShare.net.

Here is a link to my SlideShare account presentations.

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