training, kill a mockingbird, trial, Toby Elwin, blog

The value of training on trial

Our ability to become, or remain, relevant comes down to an ability to adapt.  To adapt means to learn and an ability to learn is an organization’s top priority in the final frontier of competitive advantage. The value of training becomes an organization advantage. Any item that can not show direct business impact finds their way onto an organization’s chopping block.  The strategic ability to train and to educate and the value of training on trial. Who’s job is it to show the direct link training has to top-line growth as well as bottom-line results: training designers, training coordinators, training providers, training contractors, and training programs Every dollar invested in training is a dollar taken from elsewhere.  And the business project portfolio has an expected return.  The need for training to produce an ROI means our concept of ROI needs to include both …

In review: Motivation management is resource management

January 2011 in review.  A roundup of blogs from the previous month: Motivation management is resource management — Leaders, managers, and coworkers are all under intense pressure to manage their motivation to, firstly, show up at work and, secondly, deliver to their expectations and, yes, and to their organization’s expectations.  Juggling our own professional motivation as well as the motivation of others to work with and for you remains a hourly and daily challenge. The bottom line to your organization really is managing motivation as a finite resource.  And to look at motivation as a resource that is easily expendable, easily stored, easily dissipated, and easily wasted. Fistful of beans 01/05/2011 — A fistful of thoughts from a CFO managing 10% unemployment, hiring people with nontraditional backgrounds, the CIO as a change catalyst, developing job hoppers, and big media hypocrisy. …

Evaluating risk, financial model, competency model, Toby Elwin, blog

Evaluating risk: financial models versus competency models, part 2

Models attempt to identify the assets that have value.  How to manage those assets.  And how to strategically turn these assets into money.  This is a second, follow-up, post comparing financial models to competency models to evaluate risk. As I mentioned in that post, typical financial models, and their build-outs, inherently, ignore important aspects of real-world behavior, models are truly as much an art as a science in their mathematical reasoning and interpretations. While financial models look to identify financial strengths and weaknesses of organizations, competency models try to identify critical knowledge, ability, and skills needed to lead and run organizations. Typical due diligence and valuation involves tangible and intangible research.  Tangible assets are usually classified as physical assets like inventories, machinery, buildings, and land. Intangible assets are usually classified as patents, licences, processes, and intellectual property, the knowledge of …