industry, myopia, asteroid, innovation, dinosaur

Organization innovation dies when industry myopia prevails

Industry myopia culls innovation. People who grow in one industry or cycle, through only one industry may seem safe to hire. Industry dinosaurs may fill a slot quicker or bring competitive advantage, but industry myopia rarely meets innovation need. Innovation needs to break things, to start over, and to view things from new angles. If you want to change thinking, change the thinkers, because you can not change if nothing changes. Industry myopia is business risk. Innovation Depends on Breaking Things New organization growth relies on fresh thinking and challenges the comfort of many.  A long-standing trend, out of step with today’s talent market, are job roles written to prioritize recruiting people with industry-specific experience at the cost of great technical skills. Organizations stress to managers, who in turn stress to their talent, the need for innovative thinking and entrepreneurial ways of doing things.  …

emotional intelligence, what we know, book, Toby Elwin, blog

Recap: Emotional Intelligence

Social intelligence, social competence, emotional competence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, emotional adaptiveness, emotional quotient, emotional intelligence, EQ, and EI. There are many schools and many thoughts about what is and is not emotional intelligence.  And just as many tools that attempt to measure, monitor, and predict the impact of emotional intelligence. For me, Emotional Intelligence boils down to: the way I motivate myself, the way I motivate others, and focusing my intentions to result in correct consequences If being smart or a high IQ was all that mattered than only those with the highest IQ would ascend to the C-level or highest public-sector positions.  Every valedictorian would be successful. There is something more to knowledge.  Something more than being a valedictorian to get along and to succeed.  This something includes self-awareness and relationship awareness.  Below are a series of blogs I’ve …

competing values framework, Toby Elwin, blog

Hiring the right person is more cultural than technical

As mentioned in the post Hiring is more emotional than rational technical skill rarely assures success in an organization.  There are just too many elements that impact someone’s success that are more important than technical fit. Many times when you plant an individual into a team, business unit, or client site there is potential damage that no amount of technical skill can hide:  personality clashes, culture clashes, communication gaffes, and other social or relationship awareness miscues are a few with the potential for huge impact. Hiring is more of a cultural match than a technical match, at certain levels you can expect people are smart enough to build or expand their technical skills, but can you expect them to build their personality skills. These problems can be immediate or on a slow boil, but make no mistake these problems affect morale and motivation …

Evaluating risk, financial model, competency model, Toby Elwin, blog

Evaluating risk: financial models versus competency models, part 2

Models attempt to identify the assets that have value.  How to manage those assets.  And how to strategically turn these assets into money.  This is a second, follow-up, post comparing financial models to competency models to evaluate risk. As I mentioned in that post, typical financial models, and their build-outs, inherently, ignore important aspects of real-world behavior, models are truly as much an art as a science in their mathematical reasoning and interpretations. While financial models look to identify financial strengths and weaknesses of organizations, competency models try to identify critical knowledge, ability, and skills needed to lead and run organizations. Typical due diligence and valuation involves tangible and intangible research.  Tangible assets are usually classified as physical assets like inventories, machinery, buildings, and land. Intangible assets are usually classified as patents, licences, processes, and intellectual property, the knowledge of …

emotional intelligence, matrix, Toby Elwin, blog

Hiring the right person is more emotional than rational

You have to assume every person you interview has the technical skill to do the job. Once past the traditional human resources gate-keeper by the time you meet a candidate they have the skills. When assessing a potential hire, technical skill should not bias your decision, but compliment decisions on how the hire wire integrate to your need, how they will fit in within a team, and how they meet your organization’s culture requirements. Technical Skill Still If technical skill was the key indicator of future success wouldn’t your hires all work out?  Hiring is more emotional than rational. When you interview what do you rely on to understand if the candidate can successfully integrate into your culture?  If technical skill or industry experience are all it takes to succeed than highly-selective firms, such as Booz Allen Hamilton, (now Strategy&) and Deloitte Consulting would …

Unemployed Will Not Be Considered, 3 Views, blog

The Unemployed Will Not Be Considered — 3 Views

This morning I read something that made me hold my, very hot, coffee, in my mouth, far longer than intended to process the Laura Bassett, Huffington Post Disturbing Job Ads:  The Unemployed Will Not Be Considered article. Ms. Bassett comments on a search for quality engineer on a job board that states:  “Client will not consider/review anyone NOT currently employed regardless of the reason”. A further nugget in defense of screening out unemployed: “It’s our preference that they currently be employed,” he [the HR representative] said. “We typically go after people that are happy where they are and then tell them about the opportunities here. We do get a lot of applications blindly from people who are currently unemployed — with the economy being what it is, we’ve had a lot of people contact us that don’t have the skill sets we want, so we try …

dumb and dumber, toby elwin, blog

Low risk, low return human resources

My 11-odd-years in business and talent management consulting, the other nine years in marketing, have shown a few disturbing trends that I see from most poorly-run companies. These type of organizations, across all industries, ascribe to, what they believe is a low risk strategy, but in reality, is a low return, strategy for human resources to: Take advantage of the economy to lay off the workers they don’t manage – the problem cases; Take advantage of a recession to lay off more staff than needed to slash costs; and Recruit for industry experience over technical experience There are far more, but I wanted to just get this list started. A problem with strategy 1: The root cause of the problem remains that lazy incompetent leaders, managers, and human resource professionals who don’t manage talent.  These people and their policies are …

nfl, recruiting, strategy, round, irrelevant, Toby Elwin, blog

The NFL draft and your company recruiting strategy (round 2)

The NFL draft reveals all things wrong with talent acquisition and recruiting. Looking at how an NFL team drafts provides terrific insight into what you and your company can improve upon. I wrote in the last blog, The NFL draft and your company recruiting strategy round 1, a sample list of the assessments an NFL team uses to evaluate fit: 40 yard dash, Bench press, Vertical jump, Broad jump, 20-yard shuttle, Three-cone drill, 60-yard shuttle, Position-specific drills, Physical measurements, Injury evaluation, Drug screen*, The Cybex test, The Wonderlic Test, game film* [work samples], scouts and coaches who attend games, interviews*, and recommendations* That list, like your interview and recruiting strategy, is intended to project future performance, but like all the great financial advisors tell us, “past performance is not an indication of future results”. The asterisk next to some of their tests …

Compromise When Hiring, Bugs, Yosemite

Why Startups Should ALWAYS Compromise When Hiring? — Never!

Reading a blog on the venture capital website Start Up Hire called: Should Startups Compromise When Hiring? I found a reference to a blog Dharmesh Shah, Chief Technology Officer & Founder of Hubspot* and Onstartups.com, wrote, “Why Startups Should ALWAYS Compromise When Hiring?”. I posted a comment to the blog as I felt Start Up Hire’s blog and Dharmesh Shah’s blog both have valid points, but neither blog strikes a talent management, financial case. I post the thread here as I found it relevant to my last blog: The VC’s Missing Formula: Human Capital Discounted Cash Flow. Below, you first see the Start Up Hire blog [initalic], then Dharmesh Shah’s blog [in blue text], and finally, my comment follows. From Start Up Hire’s, Team Building Blog, page:   Dharmesh Shah shared some thoughtful insights recently on “Why Startups Should ALWAYS …

bugs bunny, tortoise, hare, Toby Elwin, blog

Emotion versus intelligence — the tortoise and the hare

In my Culture war post, I advocate Emotional Intelligence as a more important quality job interview criteria than a corporate or team culture fit. What Emotional Intelligence means (EI) and does not mean as well as how to discern sides in EI* vs. IQ debate means more than emotion versus intelligence. Where IQ intends to measure the ability to reason deductively or inductively. Much has come to light to say it is wrong to expect the higher someone’s measure of logical reasoning, math skills, spatial skills, understanding analogies, and verbal skills [IQ]. IQ is intended to measure intelligence as if IQ is a proxy for expected success. The alternative key to success measurement found not on in how one thinks, but in behavior and interaction with others using communication skills:  EI. EI intends to measure how you motivate yourself and others and, critically, far …