G8, meeting, project management, community persona, Toby Elwin, blog

Community persona for project management

A project is an intentional effort to deliver a product or service that creates an opportunity – intended or otherwise. Projects have multiple stakeholders with multiple needs for, or against, project realization.

Typical project steps include initial scope design, organization impact assessment, stakeholder identification, communications planning, risk, and a second iteration of scope, delving into user community goals serves project and stakeholders more accurately.

identify, managing, project risk, Toby Elwin, blog, Tom Kendrick

Identifying and Managing Project Risk by the book

The ability to scope, manage, and view a project, from concept to delivery, through a risk lens, presents the essence of organization competitive advantage.

The opposite of project effectiveness bogs down organization capital, both human and financial, through a cycle of change requests that drain human and financial resources and staff motivation who now need to focus how to get a wrong project right.

wile, coyote, murphy's law, Toby Elwin, blog

The failure of Murphy’s Law

When things get bent Murphy’s Law takes too much credit (blame) when the more likely result being a symptom of poor planning and failures further upstream and earlier than Murphy ever came on the scene. The only law I do believe in is the law of gravity.

Led Zeppelin, project management, communication, template, Toby Elwin, blog

Scope or: how to manage projects for organization success; communication template

Project communication is far bigger than the project team. No project succeeds without stakeholder motivation and a proper communication plan to address their motivations, needs, and goals. Project communication is an effort to build commitment, understanding, and ownership around the project impact to people, process, and technology.

This template provides a planning tool to meet stakeholder communication needs. With this you can plan what to communicate, when to communicate, how to communicate, and measure communication performance.

ostrich, appreciative inquiry, change management, Toby Elwin, blog

Highlight change management — an introduction to Appreciative Inquiry

The ability to change comes from the desire to change. The key to positive change is a person’s intrinsic motivation to change. Appreciative Inquiry works around a premise that we move and change in the direction we inquire.

Inquiries into problems will find problems.

Inquiries into what is working or what is best shines a light onto what works and possibilities of how it could work. Almost anyone can appreciate a switch that turns on a highlight of possibilities.