training, metrics, important, Toby Elwin, blog

The 2 most important learning metrics

CEOs care about learning programs.  To gain more executive-level interest, guess what learning and development folks? CEOs want metrics. Give them learning metrics. The learning metrics you may have collected and reported on might need adjustment to become important to an executive. The organization challenge that leader’s need to recognize is that an organization’s ability to learn and to adapt is the only source of competitive advantage. Development professionals only gain stature in the business environment when they meet and plan business solutions. The ROI Institute and Chief Learning Officer magazine have a study recap that should provide a clearer map of our worth.  The targets of this survey were CEOs at Fortune 500 companies and the top 50, privately held firms.  From this population 450 firms received a survey and 95 firms, 21%, responded. Quick hits: 4% of CEOs avoid learning and development …

Toby Elwin, Three Stooges, hygiene, top blog, 2012

Top 10 blog posts for 2012, 10 to 6

  Closing out 2012, I look back at the year’s most viewed posts as a chance to reflect on different blogs topics of interest and what people most view.  Here as part one, 2012 top blogs, 10 to 6. Why were some viewed over others: topic, time-of-year, day-of-week? In descending order: 10. The 2 most important learning metrics — Quantify learning? It is a tall task, but one necessary for any professional who deserves a seat at the business table. Of course metrics to measure impact are important: money spent on training is money unavailable for another opportunity. If you had time with your CEO would you know the most important items on their wish list? No worries, the the ROI Institute and Chief Learning Officer magazine have a study recap I’ve referenced. As this post was originally written in 2010, looks like learning …

twitter, social media, blog, marketing

Twitter is a waste of time

Twitter has changed the way people communicate. The marketing world, as it was known, has been carpet bombed. The rules have changed. The roles have changed. In a series of earlier blogs I talk about communication in the age of saturation, so I won’t repeat those points. However, I will revisit one reality: people don’t trust marketing and public relations any longer. Firstly, people want a clear value proposition articulated to their point of view, not from yours. The features or benefits you believe are not the features and benefits they may believe. Secondly, the most powerful motivator in today’s purchase decision is a recommendation. Do you have a Twitter strategy? Does your Twitter strategy consist of ignoring Twitter or a some other proclamation around: I don’t get what the big deal is? Twitter is free to join and you …